Election Anxiety and Distress: A New Diagnosis?

How to decompress and take care of yourself.

Written by Dr. Liz Matheis

Featured on Psychology Today

2020 has been the most interesting year, to say the very least, on several different levels. Not only are we still battling a pandemic but it is also an election year. An election year that was incredibly important for our nation. How many of us have been staying on top of the latest news, debates, and headlines over the last few months, and how many of us have been searching for more information or have shared our thoughts with others in an effort to make sense of it all?

How To Relieve Stress: 37 Comments From Therapists, Psychologists & People Who’ve Overcome Stress

Featured on OutWit Trade

Written by Katie Holmes

How To Relieve Stress: 37 Comments From Therapists, Psychologists & People Who’ve Overcome Stress

Stress is staggeringly common in the US, with an earlier study from the American Psychological Association showing that 77% of people “regularly experience physical symptoms caused by stress” and 33% of people “feel they are living with extreme stress” — and in the current climate, those numbers could be even worse today.

For the many people who suffer from stress, this is a compilation of comments on how to relieve stress that therapists, psychologists, social workers and other professionals who have extensive experience treating patients with stress have sent us, as well as comments from various people who have found a method for dealing with their stress that helps them. I’ve summarized the main point in each comment below, along with a link to the full comment(s) for each point:

(image by pexels)

Parenting Is About Being Good Enough

You don’t need to be a super parent—just good enough.

Written by Dr. Liz Matheis

Featured on Psychology Today

 

Parenting is the most difficult job I have ever had. It’s also the most rewarding.

Parenting is challenging and exhausting. As parents, we place a high level of pressure on ourselves to be present, to be aware of every detail of our children’s lives and to ensure our children’s happiness on a daily basis. We feel guilty. We aim to make our time spent with our children fun and magical.

As a parent, you just need to be good enough.

Mindful Living During a Pandemic

Mindful Living During a Pandemic

Amanda Marshall, Psychology Intern

The Covid-19 pandemic has taken this year from us, and has created a lot of confusion, stress, anxiety, and frustration. Between remembering your PPE while running out to the grocery store, managing online instruction for the kids, working from home or experiencing job loss, and managing all the necessary day-to-day tasks like laundry, cooking, and cleaning – this is getting old quick! It can feel like a bag of bricks that we have been dragging around for months, and if you ask me, this is exhausting. When the world is swirling around us like this, and there are only so many things we can really control, it is important to take a step back. Practicing mindfulness is an effective tool for each of us to have in our back pocket.

Here are some tips for mindful living (especially during the Covid-19 pandemic):

Three Good Things. This practice, promoted in positive psychology, can help you to refocus your mind, build resilience, and encourage feelings of happiness and optimism. As we learn to adapt to living through these unusual times, it may be nice to start or end you day with Three Good Things. There is a lot of flexibility with how you choose to engage with this task as long as you include these main elements: (1) think of something good that you have in your life or that has happened recently; this can be something as simple as an enjoyable conversation with a friend, (2) reflect on how this positive thing impacts you and your life, and (3) take a moment to experience gratitude for the positive thing you have identified. Repeat these steps, identifying Three Good Things in your life. You may even enjoy journaling about these good things to have them to look back on when you are in need of a positive reminder.

Mindful Appreciation. This year, our routines have been dismantled, and many are struggling to find a new normal. As we move through each day, mindfulness and appreciation can help us to build a more positive mindset and provide moments for much needed reflection. To use these tools, allow yourself to have greater awareness of each of your activities throughout the day (eating, getting your kids ready, listening to the rain fall, or even sipping that first cup of coffee!) and allow yourself to acknowledge the significance of each of these small things. Sometimes the repetition of our daily routine can overshadow the simple joys, so try to draw your attention in on these moments and intentionally dedicate a thought to appreciating what is there in front of you. Recognizing the small things in life can help us to gain a more positive outlook and have greater appreciation for where we are today, instead of concern for where we will be tomorrow.

Meditation and Laughter. Sometimes finding much needed balance in life can feel impossible, but meditation and laughter can help us to achieve some of that balance by reclaiming our calm and enjoying life out loud. Meditation is quiet, purposeful, and allows the mind to rest and reduce anxiety. Laughter can be loud, it releases tension in the body and helps to alleviate stress. Laughter has an immediate effect, increasing positive feelings, stimulating the heart and lungs, and releasing endorphins in the brain. I think we could all use a bit more laughter in our lives, especially when life feels uncertain and stressful. Finding ways to incorporate meditation into your day (even if it is only 3 or 5 minutes!) and finding ways to laugh throughout each day can lead to wonderful long-term benefits and are simple ways to engage in self-care.

Life may feel uncertain right now. We don’t know what tomorrow will bring, but these are just a few small ways that we can encourage a more positive mindset, brighten our day, and engage in some much-needed self-care.

If You’re Still Consumed With Toxic Worry During COVID-19

Written by Dr. Liz Matheis

Featured on TheMighty

COVID-19 came in quickly and rocked all of our worlds — and not in a good way. For many of us, we were already anxious, and this has added a new dimension to our daily life. Nobody wants to feel this tense and scared all the time. Our children, teens and young adults are using us, their parents, as guides for their reactions and interpretations of this pandemic. So, it’s really important that we gain a handle on our reactions in an effort to create a sense of stability in our homes right now.

Why Do We Feel So Scared?

The COVID-19 virus has created a sense of loss of control over our ability to go to work, send our children to school, to walk freely into a supermarket or store and pick up needed (or un-needed) items. Many of our basic routines and freedoms feel like they have been taken from us. We feel vulnerable and vulnerability creates worry and feelings of unsafety. You are not alone in these feelings.

Image by: GettyImages

The Standards of “Shoulds”

The Standards of “Shoulds”

Jennifer Mandato, LAC

As I sit home in the silence of this quarantine, my mind is riddled with “should’s”.

I should be cleaning my house more…. I should be exercising more…. I should be practicing more mindfulness…. Those are only a few that I hear daily.  I felt because I am home more SHOULD be able to get done.  Then one day as I was unwinding after work scrolling through social media, I came across this quote by Jenny Jaffe “You’re only unproductive by the standards of the world we live in two months ago and that world is gone”. Almost instantly I felt myself exhale and a weight lifted off my shoulders.  In that moment with everything going on that was EXACTLY what I needed to hear. I was comparing myself to our previous normal of what I could get done but things are not that way.  I cannot go to stores and go about daily routines as I used to.  Our world is very different now and what I can accomplish in a day is enough.  What we can do on a given day under the circumstances is enough.  This quote has almost become a daily mantra to remind myself of as to know I am doing everything I can and that is enough.  What you are doing is enough and breathe!

 

 

Image source unknown

“My Daily Schedule is in Tatters!” How to Build Routine and Boundaries Now

“My Daily Schedule is in Tatters!” How to Build Routine and Boundaries Now

Written by Dr. Liz Matheis

Without commutes and errands and sports practices, many parents and adults with ADHD feel they should have more time. But instead they just have more work, more distress, and more disorientation — a feeling of being ungrounded and unfocused due to all that unstructured time. Perhaps more than ever before, it’s critical to carve out a schedule that balances work and home life. Here’s how:

Our boundaries are obliterated. We are employees, parents, teachers, house cleaners, personal assistants, and playmates to our children — all at the same time. Each day feels like ‘some’ day; the labels ‘Tuesday’ and ‘Friday’ are just quaint reminders of the schedules we used to keep.

Without commutes and errands and sports practices, many parents and adults with ADHD feel they should have more time. But instead they just have more work, more distress, and more disorientation — a feeling of being ungrounded and unfocused due to all that unstructured time. Perhaps more than ever before, it’s critical for adults with ADHD and parents of children with ADHD to carve out a schedule that balances work and home life. Right now, routine is the secret to giving you back a sense of the time of day as well as the day of the week, not to mention your goals and priorities.

 

Image by Unsplashed

Managing Your Child’s Anxiety during COVID-19 Interview.

Managing Your Child’s Anxiety During COVID
Dr. Liz with Dr. John D’Ambrosio of Structural Chiropractic’

Managing our children’s anxiety during quarantine has been difficult for parents, to say the least. They want to know when the can see their friends, go to park, birthday parties and resume life as they once knew it. As a parent, we don’t have the answers but there are a few things we can do. Watch this interview with Dr. John D’Ambrosio of Structural Chiropractic to hear a few good strategies.

Mama, Take Care of Yourself During COVID-19

Taking Care of Yourself Too

Written by Dr. Liz Matheis 

Now that we’ve been in our “new normal” for a few weeks, our kids are adjusting a bit to distance learning and being home 24/7. A question I’m hearing from parents about their children (and themselves) is, “Is it possible to be adjusting but still feel anxious?” The answer is a resounding yes.

As human beings, we have the ability to adapt to a new schedule, a new environment, a different routine within two weeks. But that still doesn’t take away our adult worry about a few key questions:

  • When will this end?
  • Will my kids be able to go back to school this year?
  • How many people have been diagnosed today?
  • How many in my town/state/country have not survived?
  • Do I have the virus?
  • What if my elderly parents, aunt, uncle, grandparents, neighbors contract the virus?

Worrying can occupy a great deal of your time and energy and drain you both physically and emotionally. Our children need us, right now, to serve as their grounding force, both emotionally and physically.

Click Here to Continue Reading on Psychology Today
"The various psycho-educational testing Dr. Liz conducted on our son gave us critical clues about where his learning strengths and weaknesses lie so that his needs could be better addressed at home and school. Moreover, because of their warm, kindhearted personalities, both Dr. Liz and her associate, Stephanie, formed an immediate bond with my son. He eagerly looks forward to his weekly therapy sessions. We are so lucky Dr. Liz came into our family's lives when she did! For stressed-out families trying to help their children as best they can, she is a calming voice of reason!"
- Julie C.
"Dr. Matheis has a remarkable ability to understand the unique needs of her patients and address them constructively. She builds strong, meaningful relationships with patients and their families, encouraging trust and collaboration. When working with my son who struggles with autism-related anxiety, she created an environment in which he was able to calm down and open up to her in ways I had not seen before. She was able to reach him and helped him work through his crisis/problem. Most importantly, she empowered him to move forward."
- N.L.
"Dr. Matheis is amazing. She has tremendous resources and loads of energy. She is not willing to accept anything less than the most effective results for her clients. She made me feel as if my son was her top priority throughout the entire process. I would, without reservation, give her my highest recommendations.  Thank you, Dr. Matheis!"
- Anonymous
"Dr. Matheis has an amazing ability to read kids and connect with them. She has been an invaluable resource for our family over the past several years and has helped us with everything from educational consulting, to uncovering diagnoses as well as family therapy. Working with Dr. Matheis never feels clinical and most importantly, our children love and trust her. We can not thank you enough Dr. Liz!"
- Anonymous
"My teenage son had been seeing Dr. Matheis through his senior year of high school, as he was only diagnosed with ADHD at 16 years old.  Dr. Matheis came highly recommended from our pediatrician and she has done wonders for our son as well as our family, navigating new ways for him to deal with his diagnosis without the use of medication.  She taught him ways to organize himself and even when something did not work for him, she patiently continued teaching him new ways to keep himself on track.  She has also helped us as parents to understand how his mind works so that we did not continue to blame his lack of focus on him, rather on his unique way of thinking.  Thank you Dr. Matheis!!!!"
- LG
"Dr. Liz is the best! Our family was directed to her by our Pediatrician to assist with figuring out severe mood changes, severe anxiety, strange new fears and food aversion that had come onto one of our children literally overnight. After just a couple of visits, she suggested that the issues may actually be rooted in a physical issue and suggested we immediately take our child to be swabbed for strep, because Dr. Liz suspected PANDAS (a pediatric autoimmune disorder brought on by strep). The same Pediatrician that suggested Dr. Liz would not do the swab (they do not believe in PANDAS and we no longer go there) but I took my child to my doctor who did the swab and it was positive for strep. When our child went on antibiotics, within 24 hours all symptoms went away and our child was back :-) Dr. Liz then recommended a PANDAS specialist who helped us and our child is in complete remission and is happy and healthy. We are incredibly grateful to Dr. Liz for her knowledge of all things, even the most remote and unusual and for helping us so much! Thank you!"
- Anonymous
"The various psycho-educational testing Dr. Liz conducted on our son gave us critical clues about where his learning strengths and weaknesses lie so that his needs could be better addressed at home and school. Moreover, because of their warm, kindhearted personalities, both Dr. Liz and her associate, Stephanie, formed an immediate bond with my son. He eagerly looks forward to his weekly therapy sessions. We are so lucky Dr. Liz came into our family's lives when she did! For stressed-out families trying to help their children as best they can, she is a calming voice of reason!"
- Anonymous
"Thank you, Dr. Liz. Although we have told you countless times, it will never feel enough. You have listened when J could barely speak and continued to listen when he was sad, angry and confused. You've challenged him and directed us in our roles as parents. You've helped J face his fears while the list evolved and changed, and yet you've stayed committed to 'the course.' We pray that your children realize that time away from them is spent helping children learn and that vulnerability is a sign of strength and bravery."
- June I
"My son was admitted to an Ivy League school when only 2 years ago, you assessed him and saw his struggles, his Dyslexia. We are grateful that he no longer has to carry that deep feeling of inadequacy or shame that must have kept him so self conscious and from reaching his potential. He has the PERFECT program for him. He has A's in high math and economics. He became a Merit Scholar, a Boys State legislature, the HEAD captain of the football team and help a job ALL while studying and managing his classes and disability. I am PROUD of you, a young doctor, who knows and sees the vulnerability of children and helps them recognize "it's NO big deal" God bless."
- Anonymous

Learn More About Dr. Liz!

Subscribe to our Mailing List
Psychological and Educational Consulting Logo

513 W Mt Pleasant Ave, Ste 212,
​Livingston, NJ 07039